New Hall of Fame to honor significant athletic contribution

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New Hall of Fame to honor significant athletic contribution

Cricket Gluth, Assistant Editor

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The Athletics Department is incorporating a Hall of Fame to honor athletic achievements throughout Lab’s history. The inaugural ceremony will be held Oct. 19 at 6 p.m., likely occurring in Upper Kovler gymnasium.

The inductees for 2019 will be Marty Billingsley, Class of 1977; Gabrielle Clark, Class of 2010; William “Doc” Monilow, former athletics administrator; John W. Rogers Jr., Class of 1976; and the girls track and field team members from 1979-1981.

Athletics Director David Ribbens said the Hall of Fame was implemented to tell the story of former U-High athletes with significant accomplishments.

“It could be inspiring for the kids to realize that way back over a hundred years ago, for instance, we had athletics that were in the forefront of Illinois and Chicago history, and I think a lot of people don’t realize that,” Mr. Ribbens said.

The Hall of Fame unveiling ceremony will be held in coordination with the alumni relations and development office. Mr. Ribbens is hoping to continue the tradition every year and be consistent with the selection criteria.

 “The qualifications for this first one was a significant contribution, and that contribution was measured by the impact here and the longevity of that impact,” Mr. Ribbens said.

Marty Billingsley was a track and field record setter. Now a U-High computer science teacher, she is supportive of the implementation of the Hall of Fame. 

“I think seeing that other people are honored gives you an idea of what’s possible,” Ms. Billingsley said. “That’s why we have record boards, to see [athletes] have done this, this is possible.” 

Ms. Billingsley holds records for the girls 1600m and 3200m races, which she set on a co-ed track and field team. She says she was inspired by running with people who were faster than her. 

“That’s one of the things that made me good,” Ms. Billingsley said. “I wasn’t out in the lead all the time, I wasn’t winning races every day, I had people in work out to try to keep up with.”