“Re-UNITE” art exhibit to raise questions and change perspectives

Visitors+explore+a+piece+of+art+at+the+%22Re-UNITE%22+exhibit+in+the+Corvus+Gallery.+Faheem+Majeed%2C+the+artist%2C+produced+his+art+from+materials+found+around+various+neighborhoods.
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“Re-UNITE” art exhibit to raise questions and change perspectives

Visitors explore a piece of art at the

Visitors explore a piece of art at the "Re-UNITE" exhibit in the Corvus Gallery. Faheem Majeed, the artist, produced his art from materials found around various neighborhoods.

Visitors explore a piece of art at the "Re-UNITE" exhibit in the Corvus Gallery. Faheem Majeed, the artist, produced his art from materials found around various neighborhoods.

Visitors explore a piece of art at the "Re-UNITE" exhibit in the Corvus Gallery. Faheem Majeed, the artist, produced his art from materials found around various neighborhoods.

Caledonia Abbey

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Faheem Majeed, the Kistenbroker Artist-in-Residence for fall semester, will open his exhibit “Re-UNITE” Oct. 4 at the Corvus Gallery in Gordon Parks Arts Hall with a reception after school from 4-6 p.m.

Through his work, Majeed, a Chicago native, poses the questions: “What is valued and what do we value? What is safe and what is secure?”

According to his artist’s statement, “Re-UNITE” continues Mr. Majeed’s exploration of disinvestment in and renovation of neighborhoods on Chicago’s south and west sides. 

“His sculptures are produced from discarded and found materials that often take on the appearance of billboards, signage, raw construction materials, and boarded-up buildings,” according to the statement.

The Kistenbroker Artist-in-Residence Program began three years ago as an opportunity for professional artists to showcase their work and engage with high school students. Throughout the semester, Mr. Majeed will work with students from lower, middle and high schools.

Using found materials allows Mr. Majeed to use the “material makeup of his neighborhood and surrounding areas as an entry point into larger questions around civic-mindedness, community activism and institutional critique.

Mr. Majeed was chosen last year by a subcommittee of the art department after members pitched ideas for artists to be featured. 

One of the largest pieces in the gallery resembles a billboard in the front and is made of particle board colored with Kool-Aid but has a narrow three-foot space behind, forcing a viewerto crane their neck to see “UNITE” written on the back. 

“He wants you to get uncomfortable in that space, to change our perspective,” said Gina Alicea, a visual arts teacher and the director of the Corvus Gallery.

The exhibit will be on display until December 13.