With Artsfest, students take charge

Students should lead more activities to inspire learning, empowerment

Photoillustration+by+Madeline+Welch

Photoillustration by Madeline Welch

As the Midway sees it…

Artsfest is a day where students take celebration of the arts into their own hands. Students need to take advantage of this opportunity to take control, and the administration should support other activities with similar goals and benefits.

Artsfest is an opportunity for students to emphasize the importance of the arts. Many students consider the arts a break from the academic rigor of Lab, but Artsfest highlights the benefits of the arts, such as personal expression, creative thinking and problem-solving.

With these and many other examples of how to take action, educate and inspire in the community, students should feel empowered and step up to lead.”

Artsfest is also a reminder that the arts are in fact much more than just a credit needed to graduate. On the Artsfest Thursday, students are able to experience the full spectrum of what art can be, from making soap to ribbon dancing to making lollipops and taffy. Artfest allows students to experience art in unconventional ways.

Nearly every workshop is created and run by a student interested in the workshop topic. The passion behind workshops makes them interesting and appeals to students. Additionally, workshop leaders can add their own unique ideas to learning about the arts, creating a diverse array of ideas and methodologies.

For the community, Artsfest is an opportunity to bond. Whether it is performing at Art in the Dark, cheering during opening and closing ceremonies or having workshops with people we don’t usually have classes with, Artsfest is something U-High does together that is fundamental to U-High community building. Between learning about art and building community, Artsfest is well-worthwhile.  

But Artsfest is not the only event where student leadership yields benefits. The Students with Disabilities Association recently held workshops to help faculty members and administrators understand and empathize with the experiences of students with disabilities. In April, students will run Social Justice Week, impacting the community through lunch-time and assembly period workshops. These are examples of topics that U-High students chose to bring to the community’s attention by creating engaging activities. 

With these and many other examples of how to take action, educate and inspire in the community, students should feel empowered and step up to lead.