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The Student News Site of University of Chicago Laboratory High School

U-High Midway

The Student News Site of University of Chicago Laboratory High School

U-High Midway

Through classes, art teachers aim to grow art appreciation

Ouroboros Review to host release party for fourth volume

The+Ouroboros+Review+will+host+a+release+party+for+the+fourth+volume+of+their+literary+translation+journal+on+Nov.+30+from+4%3A30-6%3A00+p.m.+in+C116.
Grace LaBelle
The Ouroboros Review will host a release party for the fourth volume of their literary translation journal on Nov. 30 from 4:30-6:00 p.m. in C116.

Correction: The time for the event was listed as 4:30-6 p.m. in a previous version of this article. Edit made Nov. 30 at 1:14 pm.

On Nov. 30 from 4-6 p.m. the Ouroboros Review will host a release party for the fourth volume of the literary journal. This party will take place in C116, with students reading various passages from the new volume of the journal. This year’s theme is “Mind, Body and Soul.”

Club members participated in a collaboration with poet Daniel Borzuztky, who will reveal his rankings of the students’ poetry. There will also be free food and merchandise.

Junior Daisy Juarez, the club president, said the club allowed her and her peers to express themselves through translations.

“It’s a really nice way to build community, while also making sure that you become a little bit more proficient in a language,” Daisy said.

The club meets Thursdays during lunch and publishes annual volumes, allowing members to show their work to the community. 

English teacher Maja Teref, the faculty adviser, is a published literary translator.

“By translating an original we become co-authors,” Ms. Teref said “we’re not just the invisible, y’know…”

“Middle man,” Daisy interjected.

“Yes, exactly, middle man,” Ms. Teref continued. “We actually contribute our own opinions and identities.”

The ouroboros, the ancient symbol the journal is named after, depicts a serpent eating its own tail, which represents how every text can have infinite translations.

Ms. Teref said, “You could go into perpetuity with translation.”

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About the Contributors
Declan Smith, Reporter
Awards: 2023 Journalism Education Association National Student Media Contests, Boston convention: Excellent, yearbook copy/caption: student life
Grace LaBelle, Photographer
Grace LaBelle is a beginning photojournalist and a member of the Class of 2026. Her favorite part of photojournalism is taking pictures at school assemblies. Outside of class, Grace enjoys going on bike rides, going on hikes and swimming. 

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