Makerspace coordinator teaches middle school computer science during distance learning

Makerspace+coordinator+Nathan+Aldredge+continues+to+accept+submissions+for+the+Makerspace+while+teaching+a+computer+science+design+class+in+the+middle+school.+

Makerspace coordinator Nathan Aldredge continues to accept submissions for the Makerspace while teaching a computer science design class in the middle school.

Clare O'Connor, Reporter

Makerspace coordinator Nathan Aldredge has been reassigned to teach a middle school computer science design class during distance learning.

Along with his new responsibilities, Mr. Aldredge will continue to work as the makerspace coordinator and run independent studies for two U-High students. 

Mr. Aldredge is also still printing student makerspace submissions, but he said the process of executing and returning students’ projects has been tedious because of the coronavirus pandemic restrictions.

Students who wish to use the tools in the makerspace may send their projects to Mr. Aldredge and then organize a socially distanced meeting to retrieve their finished product. On top of the lengthy process, students who need input on how to build their digital project plan may have to wait longer to receive assistance.

“Two students that I have in independent studies ended up just buying their own 3D printers.” Mr. Aldredge said. “I’m helping them use their printers virtually. We all actually have the same model, so I can test out stuff for them on mine at home, but obviously, that’s not possible for all students.”

I’ve told my class that I have experience with the 3D printer and other equipment like that. I’ll be able to print things for them and because of my role with the makerspace.”

— Nathan Aldredge

Mr. Aldredge said his transition to middle school online teaching has gone well. He has received advice from other teachers, and his experience with the makerspace has effectively prepared him for teaching, particularly 3D modeling.

Mr. Aldredge said, “I’ve told my class that I have experience with the 3D printer and other equipment like that. I’ll be able to print things for them and because of my role with the makerspace.”

Mr. Aldredge said he does not know if he will continue teaching in the middle school next year, but he hopes to continue working with students.

“I’m writing a course proposal right now for a new class in the high school,” Mr. Aldredge said. “I want to keep working with students and hopefully encourage more people to utilize the makerspace.”