Potter named head coach of girls soccer team

Joshua+Potter+will+be+the+head+coach+for+the+U-High+girls+varsity+soccer+team.+Mr.+Potter+has+been+with+the+team+as+assistant+coach+for+six+years%2C+and+is+also+head+coach+for+the+boys+varsity+team.++

Andrew Burke-Stevenson

Joshua Potter will be the head coach for the U-High girls’ varsity soccer team. Mr. Potter has been with the team as assistant coach for six years, and is also head coach for the boys’ varsity team.

Amy Ren, Reporter

The varsity girls and boys soccer teams will now have the same coach.

Joshua Potter will be the new head coach of the varsity girls soccer team, one of several coaching changes for the 2022 season. Bannon Stroud, former head coach, will transition to junior varsity head coach.

Mr. Potter has been the assistant varsity coach of the girls team for six years, in addition to coaching the varsity boys team. 

David Vadeboncoeur will be the varsity girls assistant coach, alongside 2007 U-High graduate Elan Weiner, both of whom have worked with U-High soccer programs in the past. The new JV assistant coach has not been selected.

Mr. Potter looks forward to working with the girls team as head coach, and he emphasizes that team culture is his priority.

I want to make sure they both feel respected and heard and cared for through my coaching style.”

“I want to make sure they both feel respected and heard and cared for through my coaching style,” Mr. Potter said. “I really want to bring a family environment, really just one of inclusion and care and love.”

Aside from implementing ACL strengthening and injury prevention, Mr. Potter hasn’t yet set goals.

“I like to have our team set the goals, because when the team is driven by the goals that they set, then it’s a little bit more intrinsic instead of extrinsic,” he said. “I want them to decide.”

Mr. Potter wants to influence people positively.

“I just want to do it the best way that I can and just continue to do it, to serve the kids more than anything. Wins and losses are good, but it’s not the reason why I coach,” Mr. Potter said. “Twenty years from now, I want someone to come into my office and be like, ‘That kid made a difference because you made a difference in their life.’”